Ansel Adams and the connection of things

October 20, 2005

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It always amazes me when something you haven't given much thought to in a long time suddenly pops up like three times in the span of just a couple days. Most recent example of this for me was Ansel Adams. I hadn't really thought much about his work recently but got a documentary in from Netflix on him.
After watching it, I did a little surfing around and figured out that you can buy some actual prints of his work for not too much money. (They aren't "Original" prints since they are actually printed by another photographer, but it's still a print from the original neg which is awesome.)
Like everyone else I had seen his prints at the frame shops in the mall. I like them okay, but was never knocked off my feet by them. Then I was on a trip to New Orleans and stopped at a gallery on Royal street that had the real thing. Totally a different experience. Looking at those, it's a lot easier to see what all the noise is about.
Anyway, that was last night. Then today, mom calls to tell me that there is going to be an exhibit of his work at the museum in HSV around Thanksgiving/Christmas….
Just weird how connected things are. If you are reading this, don't be surprised if Ansel shows up soon in your world as well.


Photography Assignment - 252

October 19, 2005

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I've got a few friends who are getting into photography. For all of them and anyone else that is either starting or heavily into photography, I have a personal assignment for you:
Make 252 photographs each week.
Why 252? Back in the days of film, the 35mm variety's standard number of exposures for each roll was either 12, 24, or 36. The 252 count is the equivalent of shooting an average of one 36 exposure roll of film each day for a week. You start your count fresh each Monday. If you shoot more than 252 in one week that's great, but it doesn't reduce the number you have to shoot the following week.
You can shoot 252 of the same subject or one image each of 252 individual subjects. (I would recommend pushing more toward the former, but that's secondary to getting the count.) Likewise, you can shoot all 252 on one day, or you can spread them out evenly over the entire week. Doesn't matter as long as you get to the goal.
Understand that a huge portion of what you shoot isn't going to be great. Possibly not even what you would consider good. What you'll be doing is learning about the mechanics and the aesthetics of photography in the best way that I know how: by doing it.
Just be glad you are doing this in the day of digital. When I did this for a period measured in years I was buying film and the chemicals to process it all. This was directly related to the reason I was pretty broke in college.
– Tags: tagPhotography


Using your phone with a small business

October 19, 2005

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There are some simple things that you should do if you have a small business. Answering and the phone well is way up the list.
I going to have my house pressure washed as part of the process of getting it ready to sell. So, I found a guys card at the bank. I'm not sure how they worked a deal to get their literature at a bank, but it worked out good for me. Anyways, I call the number on the card and after 5 rings just before I was about to hang up someone picks up and says, "Hello".
Me (not sure I called the right number): Ummmmm, is this The Pressure Washing Company?
Him: Yep.
Just, "Yep". Now, for all I know these guys may be the best in the business, but in those few seconds my first impression of them is that they don't really know what they are doing.
If you have a small business, take a cue from big business and answer your phone in the most professional manner possible. While image may not be as important in the pressure washing business as it is in, say, a photography studio, it still has an impact. If you aren't making that impact as positive as possible, you are doing yourself a disservice.
(To this guys credit, he did call me back to let me know that he wasn't going to be able to make it by today like he had originally expected. Some people I have dealt with would have let me figure that out for myself.)


Things I love about work

October 19, 2005

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There is nothing quite like going into someone's office for a meeting with three other people and then 5 min in, they pick up a call and proceed to talk for 30 min. At least this time it's about business, but it's nothing that couldn't wait for us to finish up the meeting.
Note: don't have meetings in someone's office. Go to a conference room.


Photography is what I'm supposed to do

October 18, 2005

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I've been having this thought a lot lately. I just watched a documentary on Ansel Adams (that's right, I'm a photographer AND a geek). At one point they are talking about his printing and they cut to a scene of someone dropping a freshly exposed print into the developer and you watch the print come up.
Damn near brought a tear to my eye. I haven't been in a chemical darkroom in sooooo long. Just the "digital" one that is made up of the computer in my office. It makes me sad to think that before long kids taking photography classes won't get to experience the rush of watching a print come up in the tray. Photography consists of lots of parts, but witnessing those few moments of transition when an image builds on a previously blank sheet is the most magical.
…. and now I have go buy a new enlarger.
– Tags: tagPhotography


Meteor

October 18, 2005

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I just heard someone say the phrase "Meteoric Rise". This is one of those phrases that doesn't really make sense to me. Meteors are falling toward the ground, not going away from it.


Sudoku (using the mini squares)

October 17, 2005

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Yeah…. You definatly want to do there part where you concentrate on the 3x3 squares…. Only takes about 5 min to do an easy one with that.


Sudoku - for when you want to drive yourself mad

October 17, 2005

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I've heard of Sudoku before, but never saw a free online version to play till today. Granted, I hadn't really looked. When I stumbled on this site I figured I'd give it a try. I didn't really know what to expect, but this shit is hard. It took me several hours to get thru one of the "Easy" ones.
Of course, part of the problem might have been that I was only using two of the three rules to play the game. (I missed the part about getting one number in each 3x3 square.) Oh well, live and learn.
http://www.websudoku.com/


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