Favorite Icons - new tool

July 12, 2008

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I just discovered that the free IrfanView image software can make favicon.ico files. These are the little icons often show up that show up on web sites in the address bar or when you bookmark them. Earlier, I had pointed to an online tool that does this, but I prefer local software for this type of thing so this is a very nice discovery.


Pet sign

July 07, 2008

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This is the sign in the window of a pet store. They had a few offering their various services: vaccinations, boarding, etc… This one was a bit of a surprise. It's not something I would have thought to advertise quite as prominently. Pet Euthanasia Window Ad


202,942 and done

July 07, 2008

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Friday, June 27, the Camry stalled out on me. I limped it to the shop over the weekend. Seems the oil seal on the distributor cap had warn away and oil was getting in and causing the car to short out. Cost to repair was going to be about $500. While that probably would have kept it running for a while longer, I decided it was time to retire the old '95. After 202,942 miles, she deserves a rest. image Did some online car shopping over the weekend and last Monday purchased a 2005 Honda Accord. Still getting used to her, but I think we are gonna get along fine. Here's hoping for another 200,000 plus mile car. image


Sweet Home Nostalgia

June 25, 2008

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I think this has been out for a while, but I just heard it for the first time today. I've just become became a much bigger fan of Kid Rock. Sipp'n whiskey out the bottle, not thinking about tomorrow. Singing Sweet Home Alabama all summer long. Turn it up!


Internet find: Electronics Training from the Navy

June 21, 2008

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United States Navy Electricity & Electronics Training Series - NEETS* In the introduction, the texts are defined as a "self-study course". Seems to be a really good way to teach yourself about electronics if you were so inclined. Another example of how, if you can just filter out the noise, it's possible to get a base education in just about anything if you have access to a web browser. From the intro:

The Navy Electricity and Electronics Training Series (NEETS) was developed for use by personnel in many electrical- and electronic-related Navy ratings. Written by, and with the advice of, senior technicians in these ratings, this series provides beginners with fundamental electrical and electronic concepts through self-study. The presentation of this series is not oriented to any specific rating structure, but is divided into modules containing related information organized into traditional paths of instruction. The series is designed to give small amounts of information that can be easily digested before advancing further into the more complex material. For a student just becoming acquainted with electricity or electronics, it is highly recommended that the modules be studied in their suggested sequence. While there is a listing of NEETS by module title, the following brief descriptions give a quick overview of how the individual modules flow together.

The first module - Introduction to Matter, Energy, and Direct Current is 283 pages. Guessing it's pretty impressive learning material.


Skunk Works and Bootlegging

June 20, 2008

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imageI mentioned that I do Skunk Works projects to a colleague who was unfamiliar with the term. Turning to the all-knowing Wikipedia I pulled the following: Skunk Works is a term first coined in 1943 by Lockheed, currently trademarked by Lockheed Martin and widely used in business, engineering, and technical fields to describe a group within an organization given a high degree of autonomy and unhampered by bureaucracy, tasked with working on advanced or secret projects. Reading further, I saw a reference to "Bootlegging". I didn't know that there is a business world definition for the term. Apparently, there is: In economics and business administration literature, Kenneth E. Knight introduced the notion bootlegging in 1967. Bootlegging is defined as research in which motivated individuals secretly organise the innovation process. It usually is a bottom-up, non-programmed activity, without the official authorisation of the responsible management, but for the benefit of the company. It is not in the department’s action plan nor are there any formal resources allocated towards it (Augsdorfer 1996). I do that too. I'm close to winding up a project that has been pretty much all consuming since sometime around October of last year. Can't wait to get back to the bootlegging stuff. It will come as a most welcome change of pace from the big ol' formal project.


Google Site Search Bookmarklet

June 18, 2008

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I use Firefox. I use Google. Often while I'm browsing a web site in Firefox, I want to use Google to search that site (and only that site) for something. Google is usually way better than internal search engines. Two ways to do this are: 1) to go to http://www.google.com/ and add "site:example.com" in the search box so that Google only returns results for the specific site (in this case, example.com). 2) Install the Google Toolbar which provides a convenient search box that can search the site you are currently on. I don't like the first one cause it takes a little while and I have to either type in the site name or copy and paste it out. Not hard, but annoying. I don't like the second option since I already have a ton of other stuff installed and I don't want to install the entire Google Toolbar just to get that feature. It has a ton of other stuff that I don't want to use. So, enter option three: Bookmarklets. Basically, a bookmark that contains javascript code instead of a page address. I've been meaning to create a Google Search This Site bookmarklet for some time, but never got around to it. Finally got fed up tonight and made it. I know this works in my Firefox 2 browser on Windows XP, but it probably works in some other browsers as well. All you have to do is create a new blank bookmark. Name it whatever you want and then in the "Location" or similarly named section paste this in: Assuming it doesn't get mangled somehow, when you are on a site that you would like to search with google, simply click the bookmarklet. It should open a new window with Google in it and the search field already filled out with the site you want to search. Just enter your search term after it, and away you go.


Mahna Mana

June 17, 2008

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And here's one to stick in your head: It's amazing how expressive the Muppets are. They still look great. Do doooo do du du! And one more that I found in the related links to the first one: F-ing percussionists.


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