Tricks get you the kill file

December 05, 2007

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From time to time, I get individual emails (not bulk spam) from people trying to sell me a product or service. It's a part of the gig and I don't mind taking a look to see if it's something we might be interested in. Occasionally, the people sending these notes get a little tricky in their quest to get their pitch in front of me. I recently got an email from a person I didn't recognize, but the subject line had "follow up on questions". An interesting tactic. It makes it sound like I've been in contact with the person before and event asked them something. Psychology of marketing would suggest this makes me much more likely to open the email and then see their pitch. Unfortunately, there is one big flaw with this tactic. While I like the psychologically theory behinds this from an academic perspective, tricks like this piss me off when used in the real world. So, I didn't even read the sales pitch and I've added the entire company to my email kill file which sends anything any of their employees sends me straight to spam hell.


Absolute Sandman

December 04, 2007

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image Was browsing around the library yesterday and saw "Absolute Sandman" sitting out and waiting to be re-shelved. Here's what Wikipedia says about it: Reprinting The Sandman issues #1-20. The more than 65 pages of bonus material include the original proposal for the series and the full script and pencil art for issue 19. And about the Absolute Editions in general: DC Comics Absolute Edition is a series of archival quality printings of graphic novels published by DC Comics and Wildstorm Productions. Each is presented in a hardcover, dustjacketed and slipcased edition with cloth bookmark consisting of one or more books which include restored, corrected and recolored versions of the original work, reprinted at 8 inches by 12 inches. Also included are supplemental materials regarding the creation of the work, including sketches, comic scripts, memos, etc. Kinda surprised me that the library had a comic book collection, but I don't guess it should have.


Vegas shots

November 22, 2007

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I think I mentioned before that I went out to Las Vegas for the first time back in October. It was just before my trip to Bama. The main reason for the Vegas trip was to go to another Supershoots event. Here's one of my favorite images from the trip: image And here is a link to the rest of the proofs: link


Canon

November 22, 2007

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When I went to Tuscaloosa back in October for the wonderful Bama v Tennessee game I had the opportunity to shoot an AR-15. Here's a photo CJ took of me with it. AR-15 This is basically the same thing that our Army uses. It's a little bewildering to fire it. Like all firearms, it's a controlled explosion that's taking place in your hands. You see it all the time on TV and in the movies, but actually firing one is an entirely different experience. One of the most shocking things to me was how loud the gun actually is. The volume is one thing hollywood doesn't even come close to representing. I would imagine that after one of our soldiers goes through a battle with one of these that their ears ring for days unless they had a chance to put in some ear plugs. I doubt that when shooting starts, anyone who isn't already wearing ear plugs would take the time to stop and put them in.


Hacking audio books

November 22, 2007

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I'm on yet another trip. This time by car to North Alabama to visit the mom. Before I left I went to the library to see what books on cd were available and found "The Da Vinci Code" by Dan Brown, which I haven't read yet. Back in October, CJ loaned me a copy of Digital Fortress (also by Dan Brown) which I actually managed to find time to read. Even though there were a few pretty big flaws in its logic, I enjoyed the book and decided listening to the Da Vinci Code would be a nice way to spend the 20 hours or so of road time I would cover round trip. The library CDs have seen a fair amount of use and a few are quite scratched up. I managed to get through most of them without missing but a few minutes collectively across the first seven disks. The eighth CD however was a different story. It simply would not play past the first couple of minutes. Luckily, I hit this CD shortly before I arrived so I simply spent the last little bit of the outbound trip listening to the radio instead. Since the CD player I put in my car also plays MP3 CDs I figured I'd try to rip the rest of the thirteen CDs to MP3s for the return trip. One of the CD rippers I have (CDex) has some ability to do "Jitter correction" and also power through scratches. While there are a few little blank outs in the mp3 they are much more minimal than what was occurring while I was trying to listen to the original CDs. Not the easiest way to go about things, but it's effective. I plan on putting the MP3 CD in with the rest of them when I return it to the library. Maybe someone else can benefit from the little hack as well.


Glad I missed it

November 17, 2007

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The Bama game wasn't broadcast this week. Having just checked the score to see that The Crimson Tide was defeated by Louisiana Monroe Warhawks, I'm glad of that now. I might have thrown something through the TV. I mean Louisiana Monroe, come on….


The future return of film?

November 09, 2007

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I've been doing more and more looking around at photography web sites and it seems like there is increasing tendency for them to be more like photoshop gallery web sites than photography gallery web sites. It's nice when you find people that have both parts of the art, but I often find myself looking more at the post processing that was done to the image than the image itself. It makes me wonder when (I think it's fairly inevitable) the pendulum swings back and the in thing becomes to have "unmanipulated" images. Even perhaps to the point of stuff shot on film again and printed. Probably be relegated to pure artists, but that's okay. And don't get me wrong, I like a lot of the stuff I see. But I really love images that stand on their own without a ton of post manipulation. Okay, maybe a little dodging and burning here and there and a slight bump in contrast…… he says with a grin.


New (to me) Music: World Leader Pretend

November 09, 2007

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Like the sound of "Lovey Dovey" by World Leader Pretend. Would be right at home on the Garden State soundtrack. As an aside, what the hell is up with the imdb listing for the movie? Natalie Portman isn't listed on the main page's cast list. That's stupid for a bunch or reasons.


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